Language Translation

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Dyslexic and Loving It!

My cousin asked a question, for curiosities sake, about what it is like to have dyslexia.  I thought I would copy and paste my answer here, since dyslexia almost always accompanies the spectrum gifts.

Your eyes, upon first glance, can't tell the difference between mirror letters (such as b,d).  When reading, your eyes will easily pick up letters or words from other areas and put them in the sentence you're reading...which is why reading glasses often help those who have dyslexia, they magnify it, which lessens the chances of putting things in that don't belong.  Reading with a blank paper or the blank side of a ruler covering the other words helps as well. 

Basically it's confusing because your brain doesn't know you're mixing things up when you're too little to comprehend sentence structure and meaning.  Then when you are old enough to understand things and you read aloud (like morning scriptures in my house) you realize that your verses always sound different and you keep getting corrected and you're not exactly sure why.... :)  It's confusing.  I would read exactly what my eyes saw, get corrected, read it again and it would be different.  I think that helped me develop the idea that if I read a book I didn't like enough times, the ending might change.  ;)

Then you figure it out, or a doctor figures it out and then you retrain your eyes to start over again and try desperately hard to remember that you need to look twice to make certain that "b" you see is really a b and not a d.  And when reading aloud you take extra care to follow the one line at a time.  And when writing, you try really hard to keep the letters straight in a line, instead of writing them all over the place because that's how your brain picks them up.  You know.  Basically you have to THINK when everyone else can just do.  That's all.  :) 

But the good part is, it's great training to live a life of intention and purpose.  Most people don't live life consciously because they are used to just doing and it is hard work to live a life of intention.  But when EVERYTHING takes intention to do properly, you learn that it's just normal to think all day long.  And once you've retrained yourself on one thing, you have also developed the habit of being consciously aware of every moment of your day.  It is hard to stop.  SO you focus on something else.  I suppose that makes the disability, for those who overcome it, more of a super-ability developer.  :)  Yay us!

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